Saggy Skin Is My Scar

I was visiting Escape from Obesity, as I do from time to time (I don't have time to read many blogs - I wish I could). I read a post, then read the comments. Then re-read the comments, then responded to the comments, then added an addendum to my response. Most frighteningly, to myself, I went back to read through the comments, hoping there were more.

And there were.

The comments were on the post, What Happened To Me. They are both worth a read.

I have to admit the whole saggy skin issue bothers me.
Scares me, maybe a little.

I have issues with it.

And I have some of it already.

Even though I've hovered under 300 for years now, I was over 300. Almost 340, to be exact. The loss of the 40 pounds left me with some skin on my inner thighs. It never bothers me, unless I take a hard look at it when I'm naked. I only do that when I feel like bothering myself about it.

I look at it, and I think two things. I think it looks grouse. I think it will never look good or normal. Ever, ever, ever. And then there's a little part in my head that is kind of proud of it like, dang - I've lost so much weight I've got some saggy skin.

Liken it to a battle wound, a scar, perhaps. My saggy skin is my scar. Like a soldier come home from battle, escaped with not major wounds, happy to be home, a scar the only outward sign of where he has been. My scar.

Not as romantic, surely. And, depending on how much I lose, probably not very sightly. But it's almost like a loose piece of clothing (if I let my head thing nicely about it).

My arms, saggy.

Belly, saggy.

Some of this is age and bad skin. But a great part of it is the expansion and deflation that has happened to me.

I'm really worried about my stomach. I'm worried about my face, but I'm really concerned about my tummy. See, when I run (which is rare, but happens) - it... well, it flaps. I mean, audibly.

Gosh, it's so NOT funny, and it's so NOT going to get better. And I so DON'T have the money to pay for any type of removal, either.

I hope there are girldes specifically designed for flaps. It would be disappointing to lose a bunch of weight only to be debilitated by the saggy skin.

4 comments:

Lori said...

I started wearing a girdle when my belly started getting saggy. I thought it was ironic that I didn't wear one before to look smaller. I wore it, to hold my skin in place.

I also started putting money aside for surgery. Depending on how bad it is, some insurance companies will pay for it. Mine wasn't that bad and probably won't be after I get to my goal weight. I'm hoping to have enough money to pay for the surgery once I get to my goal. It will be my reward to myself.

For another opinion, my sister who has had gastric bypass surgery opted to keep her excess, saggy skin as a reminder not to go back there.

We all have our ways to cope.
Lori

Bonita Gordita said...

Ha (your sister) - there's an idea. Kind of like that big, old pair if jeans that you never want to fit back into. But, at least you can hide those in the closet. :P

I can't really even think about surgery at this point, I think it would actually dissuade me. I don't know. Goes both ways for me.

Dennis said...

I hope that you are doing fine now, Bonita. Reading your post, I can sense how your saggy skin bothers you. I know you are in a rough situation. Losing weight is a tough battle, and the other things that are related to it. You can go through some procedures to remedy the problem. But be sure that you are absolutely ready, and you are determined to achieve your weight and look. Also, it should be coupled with holistic improvement such as getting fit and healthy.

Dennis Rode

Terry said...

I can feel your frustrations in this post. I am sorry that you think of yourself as a freak; nobody should feel that way towards themselves. If you feel like this thing depresses you so much, then perhaps it's time for you to do something about it. There are other skin technology options out there that will solve your situation without having to spend a fortune for whatever treatment or procedure.

Terry Bayer